rosé, wine pairings, Old World, New World

Charles & Charles Rosé – A Rosé So Nice, It Had to be Named Twice

Now that the warmer weather is around the corner, one of the things more and more wine lovers are looking forward to is rosé season.

There has been a steady uptick of interest in rosé wines. I’m not sure if it comes from individuals traveling to areas around the world where drinking rosé wines during the spring and summer months is the thing to do or if it’s influenced by wine makers and popular vineyards. But the consumption has definitely increased and I believe will continue to increase in years to come.

The most popular rosé wines tend to come from the South of France, but there are some from the United States that have become quite popular too. Take the Charles & Charles 2013 Rosé, for example.

The Charles & Charles rosé and wine project is a collaboration between Charles Smith and Charles Bieler of Three Thieves, Bieler Père et Fils, and Sombra Mezcal. The rosé is a blend of Syrah (86%), Cinsault (6%), Grenache (4%), Counoise (2%) Mourvedre (2%).

It boosts hints of strawberry, watermelon and tangy pomegranate with a good dose of stony minerality.

I know the most popular consumer trend in rosé wines is to drink anything and everything from Provence, France. Those are amazing wines: light, delicious and elegant! But there are tons of other options too. The Charles & Charles rosé is produced in the Columbia Valley of Washington State, but it definitely gives you a taste of Provence in the glass – a lovely mix of New World spirit with Old World styling.

This melding of the two wine worlds is even evident with the abstract play on the American Flag featured on the labels, showcasing the intent to provoke thought of the future while honoring the past.

This rosé is definitely different, delicious and affordable, coming in under $12 a bottle. I would definitely recommend exploring the wide world of rosé wines and not getting stuck on wines of a certain color or from a certain region. There is nearly as much variety in the rosé category as there is in the red wine category.